Today’s 11 Minutes of Fame

Last week I had a great conversation with two wonderful people on the comments section at chrisbrogan.com; Jamie and Josh. Jamie and I talked more on LinkedIn, whilst Josh invited me to be interviewed at his blog, joshchandlerblog.com.

This is the incredible thing about social media – I have genuinely made great connections and even friends through it. My post last month on the Exeter Twitterati detailed multiple examples, and over at the Aaron+Gould blog is an article about Trey Pennington coming from the States to Exeter, through a Twitter interaction.

Today, however, was my interview with Josh, and I had loads of fun. Josh is a bright thinker and socialmediator, so I’d not only encourage you to listen to my interview on Experience Marketing, but also get talking to Josh and subscribe to his blog.

You can listen to the interview over at Josh’s blog here.

Archived Comments

  • http://www.joshchandlerblog.com Josh Chandler

    Hey Scott,

    Thanks for a fantastic interview, you provided some incredibly smart insight, and helped me to understand a LOT more about experience and how it relates to a companies marketing scheme.

    You are welcome back for an interview anytime you like :)

    Josh

  • http://www.joshchandlerblog.com Josh Chandler

    Hey Scott,

    Thanks for a fantastic interview, you provided some incredibly smart insight, and helped me to understand a LOT more about experience and how it relates to a companies marketing scheme.

    You are welcome back for an interview anytime you like :)

    Josh

  • JamieLee

    Scott – Enjoyed the insights you shared during the interview with Josh. I am a big believer in the compelling nature of experiences – whether positive or negative. When it comes right down to it, experiences are the only truly lasting elements of our business and personal interactions. And it’s amazing how the smallest things can make or break an experience. For instance, surly waitstaff can ruin the most decadent dining experience. On the other hand, somehow the Apple store staff managed to make my three-hour wait for my iPhone (with 5 yr-old daughter in tow, thank you) an enjoyable (and MEMORABLE) experience.
    Lots to think about. Thanks again for sharing. Glad to know you!

  • JamieLee

    Scott – Enjoyed the insights you shared during the interview with Josh. I am a big believer in the compelling nature of experiences – whether positive or negative. When it comes right down to it, experiences are the only truly lasting elements of our business and personal interactions. And it’s amazing how the smallest things can make or break an experience. For instance, surly waitstaff can ruin the most decadent dining experience. On the other hand, somehow the Apple store staff managed to make my three-hour wait for my iPhone (with 5 yr-old daughter in tow, thank you) an enjoyable (and MEMORABLE) experience.
    Lots to think about. Thanks again for sharing. Glad to know you!

  • Scott Gould

    Jamie-thanks for the kind words.

    I am continually astounded at the power of experience to influence our
    lives. When talking about consumers, I totally agree that a negative
    experience can become a positive one. I wrote about an experience that
    my mother in law had with a bottle of sherry on the
    aarongouldageny.com blog.

    What made your 3 hours in the apple store enjoyable?

  • Scott Gould

    Jamie-thanks for the kind words.

    I am continually astounded at the power of experience to influence our
    lives. When talking about consumers, I totally agree that a negative
    experience can become a positive one. I wrote about an experience that
    my mother in law had with a bottle of sherry on the
    aarongouldageny.com blog.

    What made your 3 hours in the apple store enjoyable?

  • JamieLee

    Enjoyable bits of waiting in queue for 3 hrs to buy my iPhone:
    * General good nature of the Apple staff – cruising the line to answer questions and get people excited about their pending purchase
    * The cart that came around at decent intervals with iced coffee from Starbucks (I don’t drink coffee, but the offer gave me a warm and fuzzy)
    * The sense of being part of something – all a bunch of iPhone geeks brought together in a temporary community
    * The ease of the actual transaction – no muss, no fuss. Everything worked. Quick & courteous without being stuffy. Not an iota of condescension towards my newbie questions.
    * The sense of enthusiasm that staff had – made me feel like they were just as excited as me about my purchase. Felt like I was being welcomed into a special club.

    So, in short, the little niceties combined with service provided by genuinely nice and authentically engaged staff.
    Not so tough, is it? ;)

  • JamieLee

    Enjoyable bits of waiting in queue for 3 hrs to buy my iPhone:
    * General good nature of the Apple staff – cruising the line to answer questions and get people excited about their pending purchase
    * The cart that came around at decent intervals with iced coffee from Starbucks (I don’t drink coffee, but the offer gave me a warm and fuzzy)
    * The sense of being part of something – all a bunch of iPhone geeks brought together in a temporary community
    * The ease of the actual transaction – no muss, no fuss. Everything worked. Quick & courteous without being stuffy. Not an iota of condescension towards my newbie questions.
    * The sense of enthusiasm that staff had – made me feel like they were just as excited as me about my purchase. Felt like I was being welcomed into a special club.

    So, in short, the little niceties combined with service provided by genuinely nice and authentically engaged staff.
    Not so tough, is it? ;)

  • Scott Gould

    Apple do know how to work the experience. There aren’t too many other
    products that people line up 3 hours for

    The key to experiences is realising that work is theatre. Apple
    ‘perform’, the staff are the ‘cast’, the Apple Store is the stage, etc

    Even things like Apples creative use of their uniforms- or costumes-
    as part of the whole experience

  • Scott Gould

    Apple do know how to work the experience. There aren’t too many other
    products that people line up 3 hours for

    The key to experiences is realising that work is theatre. Apple
    ‘perform’, the staff are the ‘cast’, the Apple Store is the stage, etc

    Even things like Apples creative use of their uniforms- or costumes-
    as part of the whole experience

  • JamieLee

    Scott – Marketing very often IS performance. When you’re representing a brand, you have to be “on” all the time.

    I worked retail (high end jewlery sales) in my youger days and considered every interaction with a client a performance … not in that I was being disengenuious, but in that I was “on” – doing everything I could to deliver the service and experience that the customer wanted and expected.

    With the social Web, brands and their representatives have to be “on” in the digital world as well as the real world. When talking to a company or individual about a possible entry into social media, one of my first questions is always, “How do you like the spotlight?” The people representing a brand need to embody everything that brand stands for and present themselves accordingly – whether the experience needs to be hip, adventurous, luxurious, or homey.

    Thanks for engaging me in the conversation. Always a pleasure.

  • JamieLee

    Scott – Marketing very often IS performance. When you’re representing a brand, you have to be “on” all the time.

    I worked retail (high end jewlery sales) in my youger days and considered every interaction with a client a performance … not in that I was being disengenuious, but in that I was “on” – doing everything I could to deliver the service and experience that the customer wanted and expected.

    With the social Web, brands and their representatives have to be “on” in the digital world as well as the real world. When talking to a company or individual about a possible entry into social media, one of my first questions is always, “How do you like the spotlight?” The people representing a brand need to embody everything that brand stands for and present themselves accordingly – whether the experience needs to be hip, adventurous, luxurious, or homey.

    Thanks for engaging me in the conversation. Always a pleasure.

  • Scott Gould

    Jamie you’re right on with the insights. Particularily that peformance
    isn’t ungenuine. Theatre isn’t ungenuine, it is genuine! More in a
    later post though…

  • Scott Gould

    Jamie you’re right on with the insights. Particularily that peformance
    isn’t ungenuine. Theatre isn’t ungenuine, it is genuine! More in a
    later post though…

  • Scott Gould

    Jamie you’re right on with the insights. Particularily that peformance
    isn’t ungenuine. Theatre isn’t ungenuine, it is genuine! More in a
    later post though…

  • Scott Gould

    Jamie you’re right on with the insights. Particularily that peformance
    isn’t ungenuine. Theatre isn’t ungenuine, it is genuine! More in a
    later post though…

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